A Twisted Crown of Thorns ®

Reformed. Christianity. Evangelism. Modern Culture.

Q&A: Do Calvinists ask Jesus to ‘come into their heart’?

old truthJim Bublitz (who went to be with the Lord last year) had a blog The Old Truth from which I learnt alot in my early days as I came to understand Calvinism/Reformed Theology. Here is an interesting snippet from 2007 of a Q&A post with a reader called Joshua from Malaysia.

Joshua: “Here is a common phrase…..Ask Jesus to come into your heart or life…..is that how calvinists do it? … From a calvinist point of view….. When a sinner is convicted by the Holy Spirit, is there any “sinner’s prayer” to recite? If not…what would be the normal reformed way of doing this? Does “accepting Jesus into our heart” in line with reformed teachings? If not…how would you explain the steps of salvation? I know that it is GOD who chose and justified the sinner…how do you explain to the sinner that he needs to accept Jesus Christ as LORD and Savior? At this point of conversion, from my old arminian school, I am confused that we ‘invite’ Jesus into our hearts….and later was told it was the Holy Spirit… Could you explain this part? As I am now leaning strongly to reformed doctrine, I do not know how to explain this part from the reformed view…

Jim Bublitz: Joshua, as you may know, some of the most noteworthy soul winners in church history have been Calvinists, and you can look through the writings of many of them including George Whitefield and Charles Spurgeon to see the kinds of things they said. The emphasis is much the same as the Apostles as they preached that people should obey the Lord’s command to repent and believe.

Unlike much of today’s evangelism however, considerable time was invested by these men to use the law to communicate the ‘bad news’ before going on to the good news (the Gospel). Classic Calvinists avoid “come to Jesus because God loves you” as the Apostles never witnessed that way. There is a sense in which we do “accept Jesus” (those who are God’s elect are the ones that will eventually accept Him), but there are numerous problems with the “sinner’s prayer”. If you scroll down on this page, you’ll find an instance of how Charles Spurgeon closed out one of his church services. Notice his emphasis on sin and trust, and how he encourages the unbeliever to ask God to save them, rather than saying “pray this prayer” followed by “congratulations, now you are Christian!!!” as is painfully common today. I hope that gives you a better understanding, if not – feel free to write back.

Advertisements

6 responses to “Q&A: Do Calvinists ask Jesus to ‘come into their heart’?

  1. mydelightandmycounsellors June 18, 2013 at 13:17

    Reblogged this on My Delight and My Counsellors.

  2. ChurchSalt June 18, 2013 at 16:36

    I am going to do something that I really dislike, and that is leave a link to another blog in the comment area (in this case, my own blog). I recently wrote a small article regarding this subject and only offer it now in hopes that it will be of some help. It has been my experience that the “Ask Jesus In” message is one of the last things to go when someone begins to reform the Christianity they have been handed so as to align with Scripture. Link is below, I hope it helps. If links aren’t allowed here I completely understand and there will be no hard feelings on this end.

    http://churchsalt.com/2011/05/22/2391/

    • Acidri June 18, 2013 at 18:07

      I will allow the link just because you asked. Thank you.

  3. Pingback: 5 Distinctives of the ‘Reformed’ faith… | A Twisted Crown of Thorns ®

  4. Pingback: Robert Flockhart the soldier who became a passionate open air street preacher. | A Twisted Crown of Thorns ®

  5. Pingback: The Everlasting Righteousness of Christ | ACTIVE/didactic

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: